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Ashtanga Yoga Windsor 2019-08-06T09:34:37-04:00

Ashtanga Yoga Windsor

ginaAshtanga Yoga Windsor is dedicated to teaching traditional Ashtanga Yoga.  Pictured with Gina is Gina’s Teacher Day Christensen. She was the one who lit the fire.

Gina was Authorized during her 3rd trip to Mysore, India to Teach with blessings from Sharath Jois on August 9th 2018

What makes Ashtanga Yoga Different?      …Parampara

Parampara is knowledge that is passed in succession from teacher to student. It is a Sanskrit word that denotes the principle of transmitting knowledge in its most valuable form; knowledge based on direct and practical experience. It is the basis of any lineage: the teacher and student form the links in the chain of instruction that has been passed down for thousands of years. In order for yoga instruction to be effective, true and complete, it should come from within parampara.

Knowledge can be transferred only after the student has spent many years with an experienced guru, a teacher to whom he has completely surrendered in body, mind, speech and inner being. Only then is he fit to receive knowledge. This transfer from teacher to student is parampara.

The dharma, or duty, of the student is to practice diligently and to strive to understand the teachings of the guru. The perfection of knowledge – and of yoga — lies beyond simply mastering the practice; knowledge grows from the mutual love and respect between student and teacher, a relationship that can only be cultivated over time.

paramparaThe teacher’s dharma is to teach yoga exactly as he learned it from his guru. The teaching should be presented with a good heart, with good purpose and with noble intentions. There should be an absence of harmful motivations. The teacher should not mislead the student in any way or veer from what he has been taught.

The bonding of teacher and student is a tradition reaching back many thousands of years in India, and is the foundation of a rich, spiritual heritage. The teacher can make his students steady – he can make them firm where they waver. He is like a father or mother who corrects each step in his student’s spiritual practice.

The yoga tradition exists in many ancient lineages, but today some are trying to create new ones, renouncing or altering their guru’s teachings in favor of new ways. Surrendering to parampara, however, is like entering a river of teachings that has been flowing for thousands of years, a river that age-old masters have followed into an ocean of knowledge. Even so, not all rivers reach the ocean, so one should be mindful that the tradition he or she follows is true and selfless.

Many attempt to scale the peaks in the Himalayas, but not all succeed. Through courage and surrender, however, one can scale the peaks of knowledge by the grace of the guru, who is the holder of knowledge, and who works tirelessly for his students.

 Source : KPJAYI.org

NEW AND FULL MOON DAYS IN 2019*

New Moon Full Moon
Jan 5 Jan 21
Feb 4 Feb 19
Mar 6 Mar 20
Apr 5 Apr 19
May 4 May 18
Jun 3 Jun 17
Jul 2 Jul 16
Jul 31 Aug 15
Aug 30 Sept 14
Sept 28 Oct 13
Oct 27 Nov 12
Nov 26 Dec 12
Dec 26

* No Mysore class is held on the day of the new or full moon.

Class Description

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The Ashtanga Yoga method is built around the ‘Mysore Style’ class, so named because yoga was taught this way by Shri K. Pattabhi Jois, in Mysore, India, and continues to be taught this way in traditional Ashtanga Yoga schools around the world. In a traditional MYSORE CLASS, the student is taught a sequence of postures through one-on-one instruction. The correct movements, breathing, and other aspects of the practice are learned in a slow, step-by-step process accessible to anyone. This method allows each student time to practice and memorize what they have learned before adding more. Students are able to practice independently and at their own pace while surrounded by the energy and inspiration of other students in the room. The teacher and assistants work with students individually.  At first, more time is spent with new students; however as students become more proficient in their practice, they are allowed more independence, receiving adjustments and assistance only when required.
When starting an Ashtanga Yoga practice, it is recommended that students practice in a Mysore Class from the very beginning.

Remember!
Anyone can practice Ashtanga Yoga.

In your first class you will learn the basic techniques for breathing and movement – what is called  ‘vinyāsa’ – and guided through the opening and closing sequences of the Ashtanga Yoga practice. Your first practice may only be 20-30 minutes long. It is important not to learn too much too fast since this method relies on memorization and becoming proficient in what has been taught before progressing further. This approach also allows you time to adjust to a new daily routine. In subsequent classes, new postures will be added to what was learned. Thus, over time, the length of your practice will gradually increase according to your ability. Yoga is a lifelong practice. Taking time to learn this method step-by-step is so important to maintain a sustainable practice.
Practicing six days per week is recommended, even in the beginning If possible, your practice should be at the same time every day. You will respond better to the practice and make it a daily routine. Although you may find that you are a little sore in the beginning, the regularity of a daily practice removes the soreness in the muscles and invigorates the body each day. If a daily commitment to the practice is not possible, many benefits can still be found of you first start out with a minimum practice of three days a week. Please come to practice as you are able.
Each week on Saturdays– as in Mysore, India, at KPJAYI – a Led Primary Series class is taught in place of the regular Mysore style practice. Led class reinforces the proper vinyāsa system – when to inhale and when to exhale as we enter into and out of each posture. Guruji emphasized the importance of this by telling students, “When vinyāsa is perfect, the mind is under control.” He even said, “That’s the main thing controlling the mind.” (Yoga International 1995, Sandra Anderson) For both new and experienced students, led class is an important compliment to a regular Mysore practice. It’s an opportunity to ensure that each vinyāsa is being learned and practiced correctly. Furthermore, surrendering to the teacher’s count and pacing, is an opportunity to increase both our internal and external strength, and our relationship with the traditional lineage.

Source: Jois